Ethics

Legal ethics is defined as the code of professional responsibility detailing the moral and professional duties required in the delivery of legal services.

CLE Hours: 43.0 total (Subtantive 31.5, Non-substantive 7.0, Ethics 4.5)
(If you attended the session while at Conference, you are ineligible to earn CLE for the recorded version.)

This bundle includes the following on-demand webinars: 

This on-demand webinar assists those in taking the Certified Paralegal exam (“CP Exam”) by reviewing for the legal ethics component of the knowledge portion of the CP Exam. It focuses on the following:  (1) ethical responsibilities centering on performance of delegated work, (2) paralegal professional responsibility, (3) professional relationships, (4) client and public contact, and (5) the attorney code of ethics and discipline.  Upon completion, registrants understand their ethical and professional responsibilities in and outside of the work place including the key ethical principles and

Technology presents a variety of ethical challenges. This on-demand webinar discusses changes in ethical rules as they relate to technology. We also discuss ethical concerns and “red flags” relating to the use of technology and the storage and discovery of ESI.

Ethics and the Law focuses on the law and the ethical issues that arise when laws provide a certain outcome that may not be fair, ethical or necessarily the “right thing.”  We analyze and debate some key Constitutional and State Court Cases that deal with ethical issues outside of the law. Specifically, discussion includes the ethics attorneys and paralegals face with the Attorney/Client Privilege, 4th Amendment’s Search and Seizure, 5th Amendment’s Due Process, 8th Amendment’s Cruel and Unusual Punishment, 1st Amendment’s Right to Free Speech, and the Right to Privacy.

This on-demand webinar will explore perhaps the most important legal doctrine all lawyers should understand -- the attorney client privilege. The on-demand webinar will also address the separate but related work product doctrine protection. With both protections, the on-demand webinar will include up-to-date case law. 

The on-demand webinar will explore ten topics: 

Technology has become an essential part of a modern law practice. It is commonly used to do everyday tasks such as sending communication to clients and opposing counsel, receiving, sending, and storing client documents, and even filing documents with the courts. In the digital age we now live and work in, it is more important than ever to understand how technology should be used competently per the Rules of Professional Conduct and know what safe guards should be in place to protect client confidences.

When your firm obtains a judgment, do you know what comes next?

Learn the fundamentals of collection law in this basic to intermediate level course which will discuss the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, what you should be doing before you obtain a judgment, and what remedies are available to enforce a judgment including debtor’s exams, wage and bank garnishments, and writs of execution.  You will even get some skip-tracing tips on where you can find valuable information.

This on-demand webinar will discuss how to work with court clerks so they will work with you (especially when feeding may be prohibited under the ethics rules)!

Those who have worked in the legal profession for even a short amount of time know that some of the best contacts you can have are your court clerks. While ethical constraints prohibit a court clerk from showing bias toward or against any specific office, attorney or party, having a strong and positive relationship with the people in the clerk’s office can smooth many a bumpy road in a paralegal’s day.  

Legal professionals are well versed in the importance of privileged and confidential information, but the delineation of corporate counsel providing privileged communication versus business advice is sometimes difficult to clearly identify. Learn how to identify, distinguish and enforce protections awarded to confidential and privileged communications. In-house legal departments must take great care in identifying and securing privileged communications. Know how to secure information and provide the most defensible position in the face of a disclosure challenge.

Title IX cases based on allegations of sexual assault and/or harassment have ethical, privacy, and discovery issues that are unlike most other litigation. The paralegal working on a Title IX case, whether plaintiff or defendant, needs to be cognizant of the potential bounds of discovery when dealing with the transient nature of the student population, the potential existence of discovery on private devices, and the danger of disclosure that violates federal privacy laws and court protective orders.

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